August 31, 2014
"My alone feels so good, I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude."

Warsan Shire (via loveage-moondream)

(Source: afro-dominicano, via apoetreflects)

August 31, 2014
Thirst?

I just got back from a pretty extended vacation to San Francisco. The entire time, I was staying with a friend, meaning that I got excellent company and free accommodation. There is a flip side to that, and I think you guys can guess that the lack of privacy mixed with a respect for his space also meant that carrying out certain self-fulfilling acts happened to be non-existent. To be honest, I was initially a bit disappointed in the (Asian) pickings that I saw in the city. But during the culmination of my frustration, a trip to visit a friend at UC Berkeley proved to be most rewarding. I always feel lucky having straight friends who are able to be around me when my thirst even annoys myself. 

Without further ado… Samples~ 

You may think that these two pictures are simply iconic landmarks of Berkeley, but when you look closer… 

Oh… Yes. Please. What? Did I stop at two? No, but I need to keep this post  a reasonable length~ T’was a good day sniping all the beautiful sights around Berkeley. Also… Hot Asian dads who still have a strong face-game and bootygame. Don’t you just have this urge to corrupt them? Move-in week is such good fun! 

I swear I’m normal. Don’t judge me. 

August 29, 2014
Erm…

Oversaw an older white man fondling his younger asian partner/friend/rentgirl/plaything’s right breast while descending the escalator at Westfield Mall. O….Kay.

August 20, 2014

(Source: l-eth-e, via fantanny)

August 19, 2014
Patdown

Sorry American airport security, but why would you want to make the life of an innocent Canadian lamb needlessly difficult?

Pros of being sent through the ‘random’ search line/not being cleared from the automatic customs machines: Yay! I get to budge in front of everyone and not wait another 30 minutes!

Cons: Get your hands off me. I don’t care how hot and muscular of a Pinoy airport security officer you are. My butt is sacred.
“Do you want to go to a private room?”
Hells to the no! At least here in front of all these people you’ll have to keep your molesting in check. Oh well. When it comes down to it, I’d rather be ‘patted down’ than have unnecessary X-rays blasted through my body. I’ll leave the airport porn fantasies to other people.

August 19, 2014
Nice thoughts challenge

Once you get this you have to say 5 nice things about yourself publicly and then send this to 10 of your favourite followers. 

Tagged by ro-mantik

­Sleuth – I have a really scary people-centric memory. I try to keep it hidden from most in real life, because people are naturally egocentric. They think that I somehow target them as an object of affection and start becoming scared of me. The thing is, I find it hard to forget details, emotions, or events related to their lives, because to me, everyone is honestly a special snowflake (feel free to throw up). Obviously, among those snowflakes, I esteem some more than others. My memory, mixed with my intuition, also makes it extremely difficult for people to lie to me over long periods of time. One inconsistent factoid is enough for sirens to start blaring in my mind.

Smell – On my recent roadtrip across America, I stopped for two nights in the house of a friend of a friend. The house itself was seemingly haunted and could only be described as ‘ratchet’ (raccoons living in the wall, decaying wood throughout the entire structure, garbage strewn all over the place, an ant infestation, etc…). However, the worst thing about my living situation was the fact that I was sleeping in a bed that reeked of body odour. Yes, he was a burly white jock. When I got home five days later, the shirt that I slept in still reeked of his stench. Despite the fact that I have light dusting of body hair, complete with a treasure trail, I got lucky with the scentless Asian genes. After going to the gym today, I stripped down to my underwear and took a prolonged nap before taking a shower. When I woke up, the sheets still smelled like ‘Spring Meadow.’ 

Soloist – I am a hopeless romantic and the notion of love is very appealing to me. I have never been in a serious relationship before, but I am quite a capable individualist. That lack of a partner, romantic or otherwise, never stopped me from going to the theatres or checking out a hip restaurant alone, despite my preference for one. I don’t know how I will view this (hypothetically) in twenty years if I am still single, but I would rather be alone with pets than ever settle for someone who I did not love.

Soul – I’ve always been a compassionate person. I am usually seen as calm and reserved, a trait seemingly reflected by my icy-exterior, but I am quite warm inside. Injustice, especially against those who are unable to fight back, ignites a forest fire inside of me. I find it hard to forgive people who have crossed my douche/insensitivity threshold.

Superficial – There are quite a few things I am not fond of in terms of my appearance, but there is one thing I wouldn’t switch out for the world. I love my dimples. To give you a reference point, mine are as deep as Mario Lopez’s when he smiles. It’s also a trait that also happens to join my mother, sister, and me together, so I appreciate that small, outward connection that we share.

Tagging… Oh my. I don’t think there are ten people I follow who haven’t done this challenge yet, but anyone who wants to do it should! 

August 4, 2014
angryasiangirlsunited:

Are there any angry Asian-Dutch girls here? My name is Janet. I am a Chinese girl who’s born and raised in the Netherlands.
As an Asian minority living in a white community, I can relate to your personal stories. Since I was little, I’ve been called slit-eye and “poepchinees” (translated as “poop Chinese”, which is a normal Dutch word, sadly enough). When I was 11, I started my first day at a new school. Another kid on the playground yelled “Look, a Chinese. What the hell is a Chinese doing at our [white] school?” Such a warm welcome. One time, a random guy at a party asked me about Asian women’s sideways vaginas. I was angry, but my boyfriend at the time told me to “relax”’. He told me the guy was “not a racist and actually very nice”. Well, fuck you very much. Two guys once followed me down the street and kept shouting words like konnichiwa, happy ending and ching chong.
A lot of Dutch people think racism doesn’t exist in the Netherlands. They act like this country is “post-racial”. To them, every racist remark and microagression is “just a joke, lighten up”. Someone even said it’s “typical Dutch humor”.
There’s an old Dutch children’s song called “Hanky Panky Shanghai”. It’s basically a nonsensical song that mocks Asian languages. They might as well called it the Ching Chong Song. This video  (1:14) shows little children internalizing “innocent” racism by singing it at a birthday party. The video is from 1997, but schools are still doing this. I would always cringe when they sang this at my elementary school. I didn’t understand why everyone (even the teacher) was mocking my language and my culture. The kids would pull their eyes back and say “This is how you talk right? And you don’t have to pull your eyes back, because your eyes are already slanty.” 
Last year, a Chinese contestant on Holland’s Got Talent was ridiculed by the Dutch judge. This was exactly the racist shit I encounter every day. It made me angry that the Dutch media and people dismissed the racism. To them, it’s “an innocent joke”. This was it. Enough is enough. Then, a lot happened:
I wrote an article about dealing with racism as an Asian in the Netherlands, which got published in a big Dutch newspaper (NRC). I also created the platform “Number 39 With Rice”, a Facebook-page that attracted 4,000+ likes in a few days (it may not sound much haha, but The Netherlands has a small population of only 16 million people). My platform attracted attention from the media and I was invited to a very well-known Dutch television show to talk about racism (which garnered 1 million live viewers). It felt amazing to stand up for myself and others. A month later, 39 Chinese restaurants reacted to the racism by offering a 39% discount to their menu item number 39. The Asian-Dutch community finally spoke up.
After that, I’ve got a lot of hate mail from white people who told me to “go back to my own country if I don’t like it here”. I should be able to “take a joke”. Even a few Asians told me to shut up and not cause a “stir”. Fuck that.
My biggest inspirations were my Asian-American sisters, like AAGU, Fascinasian, Angry Girl Comics, Kristina Wong and Jenny Zhang from Rookie. Although the hate crime rates in the US are much higher than in The Netherlands, to me the US is a place where minorities can stand proud and fight back. I would love to study a semester in the US en meet Asian-American sisters who are also proud and loud. We don’t have Asian organisations in the Netherlands that speak up against racism. Growing up, I’ve never had empowering Asian rolemodels. I felt lonely and blamed myself for being “too sensitive” when someone called me slit-eye. And now, on my platform, other Asians tell me they admire my fire. I feels good to be a rolemodel and inspire others to stand up for themselves. No, you shouldn’t be silent when someone mocks you language, culture and heritage. Tell them they’re rude, or re-appropriate stereotypes by telling them “Yes indeed, my mother’s maiden name is Ching Chang Chong” or “That waitress in the Chinese restaurant is my sister” (something I’ve learned from Jenny Zhang). Be ahead of the game, show them how ridiculous stereotypes are and most of all: stand proud.
After everything I’ve done for the Dutch Asian community, there are still days where I feel powerless and just want to bury my head in the sand. It sucks to deal with racism. It sucks to think about it. Till the day I die, I will encounter racist assholes. My children will have to deal with them, and their children, and so on.
Most Dutch Asians would rather be silent, suck it up and “stand above it”. But they’re not standing above it. They’re ignoring racism and rather act as the “model minority”.  Although they say they admire my guts, they do not want to stand up against racism. I feel different, as if I don’t belong with the white AND Asian people.
Yesterday, it hit me. I felt lonely as hell. I love my Dutch friends. But no matter how much they tell me they support me, they will never truly understand how it feels to be Asian in a white community. I have always been the only non-white person in my friend groups. I really need to go out there and find more Asian friends. I need my brothers and sisters. I can not fight this battle alone.
HouseOfCacophony

angryasiangirlsunited:

Are there any angry Asian-Dutch girls here? My name is Janet. I am a Chinese girl who’s born and raised in the Netherlands.

As an Asian minority living in a white community, I can relate to your personal stories. Since I was little, I’ve been called slit-eye and “poepchinees” (translated as “poop Chinese”, which is a normal Dutch word, sadly enough). When I was 11, I started my first day at a new school. Another kid on the playground yelled “Look, a Chinese. What the hell is a Chinese doing at our [white] school?” Such a warm welcome. One time, a random guy at a party asked me about Asian women’s sideways vaginas. I was angry, but my boyfriend at the time told me to “relax”’. He told me the guy was “not a racist and actually very nice”. Well, fuck you very much. Two guys once followed me down the street and kept shouting words like konnichiwa, happy ending and ching chong.

A lot of Dutch people think racism doesn’t exist in the Netherlands. They act like this country is “post-racial”. To them, every racist remark and microagression is “just a joke, lighten up”. Someone even said it’s “typical Dutch humor”.

There’s an old Dutch children’s song called “Hanky Panky Shanghai”. It’s basically a nonsensical song that mocks Asian languages. They might as well called it the Ching Chong Song. This video  (1:14) shows little children internalizing “innocent” racism by singing it at a birthday party. The video is from 1997, but schools are still doing this. I would always cringe when they sang this at my elementary school. I didn’t understand why everyone (even the teacher) was mocking my language and my culture. The kids would pull their eyes back and say “This is how you talk right? And you don’t have to pull your eyes back, because your eyes are already slanty.” 

Last year, a Chinese contestant on Holland’s Got Talent was ridiculed by the Dutch judge. This was exactly the racist shit I encounter every day. It made me angry that the Dutch media and people dismissed the racism. To them, it’s “an innocent joke”. This was it. Enough is enough. Then, a lot happened:

I wrote an article about dealing with racism as an Asian in the Netherlands, which got published in a big Dutch newspaper (NRC). I also created the platform “Number 39 With Rice”, a Facebook-page that attracted 4,000+ likes in a few days (it may not sound much haha, but The Netherlands has a small population of only 16 million people). My platform attracted attention from the media and I was invited to a very well-known Dutch television show to talk about racism (which garnered 1 million live viewers). It felt amazing to stand up for myself and others. A month later, 39 Chinese restaurants reacted to the racism by offering a 39% discount to their menu item number 39. The Asian-Dutch community finally spoke up.

After that, I’ve got a lot of hate mail from white people who told me to “go back to my own country if I don’t like it here”. I should be able to “take a joke”. Even a few Asians told me to shut up and not cause a “stir”. Fuck that.

My biggest inspirations were my Asian-American sisters, like AAGU, Fascinasian, Angry Girl Comics, Kristina Wong and Jenny Zhang from Rookie. Although the hate crime rates in the US are much higher than in The Netherlands, to me the US is a place where minorities can stand proud and fight back. I would love to study a semester in the US en meet Asian-American sisters who are also proud and loud. We don’t have Asian organisations in the Netherlands that speak up against racism. Growing up, I’ve never had empowering Asian rolemodels. I felt lonely and blamed myself for being “too sensitive” when someone called me slit-eye. And now, on my platform, other Asians tell me they admire my fire. I feels good to be a rolemodel and inspire others to stand up for themselves. No, you shouldn’t be silent when someone mocks you language, culture and heritage. Tell them they’re rude, or re-appropriate stereotypes by telling them “Yes indeed, my mother’s maiden name is Ching Chang Chong” or “That waitress in the Chinese restaurant is my sister” (something I’ve learned from Jenny Zhang). Be ahead of the game, show them how ridiculous stereotypes are and most of all: stand proud.

After everything I’ve done for the Dutch Asian community, there are still days where I feel powerless and just want to bury my head in the sand. It sucks to deal with racism. It sucks to think about it. Till the day I die, I will encounter racist assholes. My children will have to deal with them, and their children, and so on.

Most Dutch Asians would rather be silent, suck it up and “stand above it”. But they’re not standing above it. They’re ignoring racism and rather act as the “model minority”.  Although they say they admire my guts, they do not want to stand up against racism. I feel different, as if I don’t belong with the white AND Asian people.

Yesterday, it hit me. I felt lonely as hell. I love my Dutch friends. But no matter how much they tell me they support me, they will never truly understand how it feels to be Asian in a white community. I have always been the only non-white person in my friend groups. I really need to go out there and find more Asian friends. I need my brothers and sisters. I can not fight this battle alone.

HouseOfCacophony

July 31, 2014
voglio-scopare:

petrapansneverland:

ultrafunnypictures:

THIS. 100 times, this.

Yes please

Dude, this is so well said.

voglio-scopare:

petrapansneverland:

ultrafunnypictures:

THIS. 100 times, this.

Yes please

Dude, this is so well said.

(via prestidigital)

July 29, 2014
"Promise me you will not spend so much time treading water and trying to keep your head above the waves that you forget, truly forget, how much you have always loved to swim."

— Tyler Knott Gregson (via jhbrd)

July 29, 2014
How to Understand Your INFJ: Part 1

iminfj:

1. Accept that you will never really understand your INFJ. If it were possible for anyone to 100% understand any INFJ, an INFJ would have wrote a book on it by now. But the truth is, even we INFJs can’t completely understand ourselves, so we don’t expect you to. But we can tell when you’re…

Truths. Life ain’t easy for us, but we wouldn’t have it any other way